The Do’s and Don’ts of E-book Cover Design

The Do's and Don'ts of E-book Cover Design

You worked hard to write a book, and now you’re ready to publish. Woo hoo! But, wait. Have you thought about your e-book cover yet? As an e-book author, you face unique challenges when it comes to designing that perfect cover since it will only be seen online. 

E-book design is way more important than most authors realize. If your e-book cover doesn’t grab a reader’s attention, you could potentially lose a sale or even several thousand. Your design must represent the book you’ve created, draw in readers and make your title stand out from the competition.

That might sound overwhelming, so here are a few do’s and don’ts to consider as you create (or hire a pro to create for you) your e-book cover: Continue reading

Self-publishing with Google Docs and Booktango, a first-hand Experience

Self-publishing with Google Docs and Booktango, a First-hand Experiences

This in-depth blog post about a Booktango author’s first-hand experience was originally posted on William L. Weaver’s blog, Choice Management.

The Booktango Service

In March of 2012, I came across Booktango, a service of Author Solutions in Bloomington, Indiana which is now owned by Penguin Books, that in turn is owned by Pearson, PLC. The cool thing about Booktango is that it is a freemium service that provides individuals an online website to assemble their eBook, scan it for formatting errors, register and assign an ISBN, produce PDF, MOBI, and EPUB files, and have them listed for sale at Booktango, Amazon, Google Play, Apple iTunes, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Scribd, and Sony.

All of the above services are 100% free, and there is an additional menu of packages you can purchase that currently range from $49 – $359. The add-on services for a fee include things that employ creative humans who assist in your project including editing, interior images, U.S. Copyright filing, consultation on social media promotion, custom cover design, and marketing assistance. Continue reading

Year in Review – Celebrating Our One Year Anniversary

December is often a time of reflection for me and for most people. I spend time thinking about the accomplishments I’ve made over the last year, the opportunities to do better and to set my goals for the coming year.

Coincidentally, this year in addition to reflecting on my personal life and career,  I also get to take a look back at Booktango. Booktango officially went live to the world in Beta one year ago.  It’s been an exciting year and as we close out 2012 and celebrate our first anniversary, I wanted to take some time to celebrate the last 12 months and look ahead to 2013.

December 2011

At launch, Booktango had some of the core features you see today such as the online editor, error identification, e-book details collection, retailer selection and submission. We knew we weren’t done, but we were excited to get an initial product out and begin gathering feedback from our authors. We continued to develop and plan new features for roll out during the first few months following launch. Continue reading

Announcing New E-book Publishing Packages: Socializer & Eye Catcher

Since starting this blog back in April, we’ve discussed a wide variety of issues on the topic of e-book publishing. But we keep coming back to two key aspects that seem intrinsically important to publishing in the digital space: online marketing and e-book design.

As we’ve come to fully realize the importance of these topics, we’ve developed innovative enhancements to our online cover design platform, and we’ve added some unique e-book marketing services to help our authors create better-looking e-books and share them more efficiently with the world. Now, we’ve taken things a step further and created two new publishing packages that are designed to help authors meet their e-book publishing goals in these areas.

Introducing the Socializer package

Social media offers one of the most exciting opportunities for online book marketers; but it can also be one of the most daunting. There’s a lot to know and learn about the Continue reading

And the Survey says … Design Your Book Cover with Confidence

Feature Release: Side-by-Side Book Cover Compare and Social Media Sharing

A few months ago I wrote a post about three valuable elements of great book cover design. Those elements included:

  1. Create a title that evokes curiosity
  2. Create a compelling visual
  3. Design with the reduced visibility of your cover in mind

Sometimes as authors we can get so close to crafting our book that we forget we’re not the audience for our book. For example, we might design our book cover based on the colors and visual elements we like instead of thinking about what our audience might like. In a former life as an ad executive for JWT, I found we often needed to remind our clients, “It’s not about you; it’s about your customers.” In your case, as an author, sometimes you need to remember, “It’s not about you; it’s about the people who will read your book and tell their friends about it.”

There are times when you know in your gut what your audience wants in a book cover. There are other times when it would be ideal if you could solicit feedback from prospective readers and allow their feedback to guide your design.  Continue reading

3 Valuable Elements to E-Book Cover Design

3 Valuable Elements to E-book Cover Design

Think about the last thing you bought. What convinced you to buy it? Were you satisfied with it?

In my own purchasing experience, I’ve found that my satisfaction with a product, e-book or service depends on whether my perceived value of the item exceeds the price that I paid.

I’m usually happy with my purchase if the following conditional statement applies:

If Price Paid < Chris’ Perceived Value of the Product Purchased, then Chris is a satisfied customer and will likely recommend the product

There are many ways that we derive value from e-books, including: the cover, the book’s content, friends’ opinions of the e-book, the price, and the enjoyment or learning potential. As an author you want to increase a reader’s perceived value from the first moment they see it.

Continue reading